Do You Have Rights to Criminal Compensation in Australia?

Criminal compensation is a program set up in Australia that is meant to compensate victims of crimes for their injuries, property loss, and the like. If you’ve been the victim of a crime and are interested in seeking compensation, you would do well to discuss your rights and options with a lawyer, as they can advise you of how to file and if you personally are eligible. In the meantime, note a few factors about this program so you can have a better understanding of how it works and if it may apply in your case.

1. What if property loss wasn’t so catastrophic?

It’s obvious you should be compensated if you had jewelry, expensive electronics, or your car stolen and were not compensated through your insurance company for these losses. However, criminal compensation in Australia can also cover incidental expenses and losses, such as clothing that was damaged during an attack or other such smaller items that were stolen. Don’t assume that your losses are not catastrophic enough to make you eligible for compensation, but instead, make a list of your losses and bring this with you when you meet with a lawyer.

2. What about medical expenses?

Your insurance company may pay for some medical expenses, but they can also be covered under the criminal compensation program. Note too that this includes psychological treatment that is needed because of being the victim of a crime. If you are seeking help for PTSD, anxiety, depression, and other such mental and emotional issues because of being victimized, this too is something to discuss with your lawyer to see if any costs not covered by your insurance may be covered under the program.

3. What about funeral costs?

If a member of your family was killed during the course of a criminal act, you may be entitled to compensation for funeral costs as a result. A lawyer can advise you on your rights in this type of case, if there are limits to these costs, and so on.

4. Who pays?

The criminal compensation program in Australia is paid out by the government, and the state will then try to collect or recoup these costs from the offender. The victim himself or herself is not involved in these collection processes, so he or she would not need to again face their assailant or anyone else in order to recoup these expenses.